Categories
Philosophy

But sometimes, the author doesn’t spend a whole article making an argument–instead, they spend some time telling an introductory story, or offering background information.

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by our team of experts, At affordable rates

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order Now

Your goal, in this assignment, is to use the internet to find an analyze an argument “in the wild”–that is, an argument someone makes outside the context of a philosophy classroom.
You’ll find a short piece of writing on the internet in which someone makes an argument, and do some brief writing to explain how that argument is structured.
Step 1: Find a short piece of writing published in the last few months (that is, during or after June 2022) in which someone makes an argument. An easy way to do this is to find a newspaper’s “Opinion” or “Op-Ed” page. For instance:
https://richmond.com/opinion
https://www.usatoday.com/opinion/
Step 2: Start your assignment by sharing the title, author, and URL for the article you’ve found. Then, copy-and-paste a chunk or two of the article in which the person makes an argument. (Sometimes this is the whole piece. But sometimes, the author doesn’t spend a whole article making an argument–instead, they spend some time telling an introductory story, or offering background information. Limit your focus to the parts where the author is giving you reasons to believe their primary conclusion, and the parts where they’re responding to objections.)
Step 3: Offer a summary of the argument in premise-conclusion form. Make sure your premises cover all the major ways in which the author provides support for–that is, reasons to believe–their conclusion.
Step 4: Explain, in a few sentences, how (if at all) the author supports each of the premises in their argument. (Sometimes, the author won’t offer any extra support for a premise; they’ll just state that it’s true without defending it further. If that’s what happens, feel free to say something like “the author provides no support for this premise; they simply state that it’s true.”)
Step 5: Objections! See if the author considers any objections to their argument.
If they do, explain what the objection is, and how the author responds.
If they do not, say so, and then offer a possible objection of your own–that is, a way that someone could claim that the author’s argument doesn’t work. (You should either claim that the argument is not valid or that one of its premises is false.)
An example is attached.

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order Now

Leave a Reply