Categories
Philosophy

“i’ve graded discussion 3 and added my own thread to the forum, on the difference between induction and deduction as exemplified in the sherlock holmes’ video and short story.

I’m adding here the discussion questions but don’t answer those questions. I have already submitted those. I’m attaching here the discussion questions and the readings just to give you the idea of the topic. I’m adding here the example my professor have given basically that’s the discussion answer and two other examples. These are my professor’s instructions for the paper you will be writing and it will be really great if you can write something better then the other two examples I have attached he wants me to write something like that. he stated,
“I’ve graded Discussion 3 and added my own thread to the Forum, on the difference between induction and deduction as exemplified in the Sherlock Holmes’ video and short story. It contains some thoughts on both types of inference that I’d like to share with you.Here’s an offer: if you read it and reply substantively to the thread, I’ll raise your grade. The more substantial your reply, the higher I’ll raise your grade on the assignment. If you earned a perfect score (60), then I’d be REALLY interested in your response, and I’ll raise your grade, too.”
So, it’s basically an extra credit assignment. You have to write the distinction between induction and deductions and give their examples using p1, p2, c and using x,y,c the the way the examples have used. And you can add if they are valid or invalid. I have given all the examples and the instructions.

Categories
Philosophy

Comments from customer the instructions, rubric, and the 3 necessary sources lis

Comments from Customer
The instructions, rubric, and the 3 necessary sources listed in the instructions are attached.

Categories
Philosophy

These are the videos related to the writing.

I’m attaching here the instructions. If you need one more page to write let me know please. These are the videos related to the writing.


Categories
Philosophy

Are there problems that you see with it?

we are given a text we have to read from and do the instructions of the assignment. Please after reading the text and deciding on an example message me so i confirm with the professor if the example the writer has chosen is acceptable so i’d prefer they start working on it as soon as possible
These are the instructions:
1. Choose some specific experience that you have had or can have involving the use of memory. The kind of “memory” involved can be any discussed by Bergson: habit memory, retention, recollection…even pure memory. The example can be anything, from recognition, to perception, to recollection, to dreaming…even to deja vu! The first task is to describe the experience in careful, precise detail, just as it is (or was) experienced. At this stage, do not rely on Bergson’s conceptual scheme; just give a common sensical description, albeit one involving attention to detail!
2. Next, explain how Bergson would describe the experience you chose. You will want to make use of his terminology where possible: duration, tension, levels of consciousness, attention to life, etc.
3. Finally, consider how well your description accords with how Bergson would describe the same experience. Are the differences just due to relying too much on common sense ideas? Are there features of the experience that are not captured well by Bergson’s account? Are there problems that you see with it?

Categories
Philosophy

Professor is very strict and will not allow it whatsoever.

please only use the files i uploaded.
no additional information at all.
professor is very strict and will not allow it whatsoever.
thank you

Categories
Philosophy

– make it organized with paragraphs

Topic: To what extent does the Copernican revolution conform to Popper’s account of the aims and methods of science?
Citations: only use pages from the book (not even the whole book). Only the ones I attached.
comments:
– Do not make it overly professional
– Make it organized with paragraphs
– Times New Roman (12 pt) double-spaced
– You can use the first person if it will aid in your discussion

Categories
Philosophy

Have a maximum of 6 premises and a minimum of 3.

1. Follow the instructions on the Argument Analysis worksheet file attached. Have a maximum of 6 premises and a minimum of 3.
2. Then follow the instruction on the Exploration file.

Categories
Philosophy

(1) how do the categories alienation, condemnation, enslavement, and depravity as described in the reading, lecture, and videos have in human suffering?

Discussion Board: Relying on Strachan chaps 2, Read Keller chaps 1-4; Genesis chapter 3, please post your beliefs about human nature and sin. What do you believe about sin and human problems and suffering? (1) How do the categories Alienation, Condemnation, Enslavement, and Depravity as described in the reading, lecture, and videos have in human suffering? (2) How does your belief compare to the insights offered by Keller? (3) What role does community and relationships play in human suffering?
use biblegateway
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Epistemology worldview
Strachan, O. (2019). Reenchanting Humanity: A Theology of Mankind. Mentor. ISBN-13: 978-1527105027. Kindle edition available from Amazon.com:

Keller, T. (2015). Walking with God through suffering. Penguin. ISBN-13: 978-1594634406

Categories
Philosophy

Why or why not?

PART I
________
Identify at least two areas in which you have knowledge, at least two areas in which you want to know more about, and why this is of interest to you.
PART II
________
Love Languages Reflection: https://5lovelanguages.com/.
Take a few minutes to explore the Web site. Complete the survey to find out your love language. Then have a significant other such as a spouse, partner, family member, etc. (does not have to be a romantic interest) complete the survey as well.
In a well-written summary, reflect on both survey results, and respond to the following questions.
Describe your love language supported with lesson content.
Were you surprised by the results? Why or why not?
Describe the other person’s love language.
Again, were you surprised? Why or why not?
What changes can you make to communicate and express love more effectively to your significant other?

Categories
Philosophy

In the apology (29e-30b), socrates explains why his examination of people’s opinions is beneficial to the citizens of athens.

CONTENT: Comments are in the file attached below, please follow it to revise the paper.
Do not use direct quote from the text, paraphrase in your own words.
Use some context in the Meno regarding the last comment.
Comments from Customer
PREVIOUS PAPER INSTRUCTIONS (#483527124): Instructions:
Do not quote from the text; rephrase everything in your own words.
In the Apology (29e-30b), Socrates explains why his examination of people’s opinions is beneficial to the citizens of Athens. He does so by arguing that it allows them to pursue the most important thing for a human being, namely virtue, which is what turns a human being into an excellent human being.
Start by explaining in what Socrates’ examination consists, and why he decided to engage in it. Then explain why this examination, according to Socrates, allows one to pursue the most important thing, i.e. virtue, and what virtue is. Finally, explain why virtue is the most important thing for a human being (what kind of good is it?).
The paper must start with an introduction. The role of the introduction is to provide some context for the topic you are going to examine. The length of the
introduction must be proportionate to the length of the paper.
After having briefly introduced the topic, you need to give a coherent presentation of the subject(s) you are asked to examine.
Reading:
This is the truth of the matter, men of Athens: wherever a man has
taken a position that he believes to be best, or has been placed by his
commander, there he must I think remain and face danger, without a
thought for death or anything else, rather than disgrace. It would have e
been a dreadful way to behave, men of Athens, if, at Potidaea, Amphipolis, and Delium, I had, at the risk of death, like anyone else, remained
at my post where those you had elected to command had ordered me,
and then, when the god ordered me, as I thought and believed, to live
the life of a philosopher, to examine myself and others, I had abandoned
my post for fear of death or anything else. That would have been a 29
dreadful thing, and then I might truly have justly been brought here
for not believing that there are gods, disobeying the oracle, fearing
death, and thinking I was wise when I was not. To fear death, gentlemen,
is no other than to think oneself wise when one is not, to think one
knows what one does not know. No one knows whether death may not
be the greatest of all blessings for a man, yet men fear it as if they knew
that it is the greatest of evils. And surely it is the most blameworthy b
ignorance to believe that one knows what one does not know. It is
perhaps on this point and in this respect, gentlemen, that I differ from
the majority of men, and if I were to claim that I am wiser than anyone
in anything, it would be in this, that, as I have no adequate knowledge
of things in the underworld, so I do not think I have. I do know,
however, that it is wicked and shameful to do wrong, to disobey one’s
superior, be he god or man. I shall never fear or avoid things of which
I do not know, whether they may not be good rather than things that c
12. The scene between Thetis and Achilles is from the Iliad xviii.94 ff.
34 PLATO
I know to be bad. Even if you acquitted me now and did not believe
Anytus, who said to you that either I should not have been brought
here in the first place, or that now I am here, you cannot avoid executing
me, for if I should be acquitted, your sons would practice the teachings
of Socrates and all be thoroughly corrupted; if you said to me in this
regard: “Socrates, we do not believe Anytus now; we acquit you, but
only on condition that you spend no more time on this investigation
and do not practice philosophy, and if you are caught doing so you
will die”; if, as I say, you were to acquit me on those terms, I would
say to you: “Men of Athens, I am grateful and I am your friend, but I
will obey the god rather than you, and as long as I draw breath and
am able, I shall not cease to practice philosophy, to exhort you and in
my usual way to point out to any one of you whom I happen to meet:
‘Good Sir, you are an Athenian, a citizen of the greatest city with the
greatest reputation for both wisdom and power; are you not ashamed
of your eagerness to possess as much wealth, reputation, and honors as
possible, while you do not care for nor give thought to wisdom or truth,
or the best possible state of your soul?’ Then, if one of you disputes
this and says he does care, I shall not let him go at once or leave him,
but I shall question him, examine him, and test him, and if I do not
think he has attained the goodness that he says he has, I shall reproach
him because he attaches little importance to the most important things
and greater importance to inferior things. I shall treat in this way anyone
I happen to meet, young and old, citizen and stranger, and more so
the citizens because you are more kindred to me. Be sure that this is
what the god orders me to do, and I think there is no greater blessing
for the city than my service to the god. For I go around doing nothing
but persuading both young and old among you not to care for your
body or your wealth in preference to or as strongly as for the best
possible state of your soul, as I say to you: Wealth does not bring about
excellence, but excellence makes wealth and everything else good for
men, both individually and collectively.”